Monday, December 19, 2005

The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe

Starting in the fifth grade, when our teacher read all the Chronicles of Narnia aloud to us, I began reading the books more or less every year up until some time in high school. I think I even read them once in college.

So of course I have been a bit nervous about a movie coming out, wondering if it could possibly do the story justice. And of course a movie is not a book, and seeing/hearing something is not the same as imagining it. But all the preliminary things I read said that it was well done, so I dared to hope.

I crossed my fingers, bought a ticket, and saw it yesterday with my sister, Lisa.

It was WONDERFUL!!

If you haven't seen it yet, do go. And take kleenex, if you're like me. And then enjoy smiling repeatedly in the hours that follow as you bask in the memories.

(And keep your eyes open!)

5 comments:

Lisa said...

It was an honor to share the experience with you, Sheila! I hope that others will really *see* the movie and appreciate it as much as we did!

thebeloved said...

I agree! I loved it and after growing up on the stories I had some trepidation. I hope others *see* the message as well as the movie.

Jay said...

I've now seen the movie twice and although I thought surely I would grow bored during the second viewing of this 2-1/2 hour film, I actually loved it more the second time. Yes, bring Kleenex. (Even my stoic mechanical-engineer brother-in-law was wiping tears from his cheeks.) Afterward I went to an online forum where TLTW&TW was being discussed. Unfortunately, like most online chat rooms, the discussions degraded into "liberal left" vs. "religious right" accusations and name-calling. As a Christian knowing the story of C.S. Lewis and the parallels of his story to the story of Christ, I was deeply moved. Some in the forum were calling it Christian propaganda while others described it as a good story in spite of or regardless of its deeper meaning. I tend to agree with College Hills (Lebanon, TN) church minister John Grant who said, "It's not as much likely to change a life as it is to start a conversation. But sometimes that's a gift all its own." A must see!

Sheila Vamplin said...

I find it both sad and amusing that the arguments Jay refers to are going on, from either side. Lewis himself wrote that stories need to be enjoyed for the sake of the stories themselves; he did not write Narnia as a strict allegory or as a sermon.

And if you know anything about Lewis and his life, you know that this particular story was conceived and influenced greatly by The Story, and to try to separate the two seems to me a bit...well, obtuse, at least.

Either way of distorting the story and pulling Lewis into an arugment strikes me as disrespectful to the author.

(But then, oh, yes! In a postmodern world, I have to remember, it doesn't matter the the writer himself intended with his writing, or what commentary he himself provided, does it?? Everyone can decide for himself what it means....)

Sheila Vamplin said...

I find it both sad and amusing that the arguments Jay refers to are going on, from either side. Lewis himself wrote that stories need to be enjoyed for the sake of the stories themselves; he did not write Narnia as a strict allegory or as a sermon.

And if you know anything about Lewis and his life, you know that this particular story was conceived and influenced greatly by The Story, and to try to separate the two seems to me a bit...well, obtuse, at least.

Either way of distorting the story and pulling Lewis into an arugment strikes me as disrespectful to the author.

(But then, oh, yes! In a postmodern world, I have to remember, it doesn't matter the the writer himself intended with his writing, or what commentary he himself provided, does it?? Everyone can decide for himself what it means....)